Department of Spanish & Italian

AAIS 2019: Sessions

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Call For Papers: Sessions and Round Tables

1. THE ART OF WAR: AESTHETICS OF WARFARE NARRATION IN ITALIAN CULTURE

From Medieval knights to movies, war is an essential part of Italian culture. This session explores the means through which warfare narratives in both fictional and non-fictional settings become artistic expression in/through literature, arts, music, theater, cinema, comics and other media. How do artists/writers/movie directors portray the experience of war? Why are we attracted by war narratives? How do beauty or brutality impact the audience perception of war? Do features that appeal to our sense of beauty or pleasure exorcise the experience of war, provoke empathy, or hide an instead crude reality? What is the role of heroism or violence?

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30th, 2018

Organizer: Lucia Gemmani
The University of Iowa
lucia-gemmani@uiowa.edu

 

2. THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION, TECHNOLOGY, AND MACHINES IN ITALIAN LITERATURE

This session’s purpose is to explore the role of technological inventions in Italian prose fiction and poetry during the Age of Industrialization. Did such devices and machines as the train, the photographic camera, automata, the telegraph, etc., as well as the new technologies of European Industrialization have an impact on the writing of fiction and poetry in Italy? If yes, how? If not, or only to a limited extent, then what does such an absence or indifference suggest? Proposals on the Futurists will be considered but are not the primary scope of this session.

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30th, 2018

Organizers: Ana Ilievska
The University of Chicago
ailievska@uchicago.edu

Organizers: Gianna Albaum
New York University
gja234@nyu.edu

 

3. ETHICS AND OMISSION IN THE ITALIAN TRADITION

The ineffability of Dante’s paradise. The missing pieces of Manzoni’s manuscript. The blank spaces of Marinetti’s parole in libertà. The final words – unheard – of La dolce vita. The invisible cities of Italo Calvino. As much as any other, the Italian artistic tradition is defined by absence, omission, silence, and lacunae – even in works that stage themselves, or which can be interpreted, as distinctly didactic in nature: examples of artistic impegno. The proposed session invites presentations from across all time periods and across the Italian tradition that explore the relationship between strategic omission and ethical engagement.

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30th, 2018

Organizer: John Andrew Welsh
Wake Forest University
welshja@wfu.edu

 

4. GENDER VIOLENCE IN ITALIAN CINEMA

This session explores representations of violence on women and by women in contemporary Italian cinema. Especially welcome are proposals that examine portrayals of femminicidio, sexual abuse, domestic violence, stalking, etc. in relation to social changes in Italy. How is gender-based violence represented in recent films? Is a voyeuristic effect what primarily leads to such representations? What are the ethical implications when it comes to representing these forms of violence? How might these portrayals question notions such as patriarchy, male chauvinism, and women’s emancipation?

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30th.

Organizer: Veronica Vegna
Affiliation: The University of Chicago
Email: vvegna@uchicago.edu

 

5. MODERN ITALIAN CINEMA: UNDERSTUDIED FILMS AND DIRECTORS

This panel seeks to highlight and contribute to the study of often-ignored cinematic works and filmmakers in Italy, as well as to emphasize the rare or lesser-known and understudied filmic efforts of established, successful Italian directors. Feature-length fictional films (and screenplays) will constitute the principal focus of this session, though presentations on other genres and forms of media will be considered; including though not limited to documentaries, shorts, television shows, and made-for-TV movies.

Topics may include the following:
Undervalued films and filmmakers
Understudied films: creating a critical discourse
Cinematic aesthetics and influences
Cinematic adaptations from literature
Women and gender dynamics on screen
Cinema and Political engagement
Fascist Cinema (1922-1945)
Published and unpublished screenplays
Unfinished film projects

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizers by December 30th.

Philip Balma
University of Connecticut
philip.balma@uconn.edu

Alessandra Galassi
University of Connecticut
alessandra.galassi@uconn.edu

 

6. PUBLIC SPACES / PRIVATE SPACES IN CONTEMPORARY ITALY

Public and private are social constructs that conceptualize different domains of everyday life, from the privacy of our homes to the publicness of city streets. Public and private spaces operate at a variety of scales that intersect, creating a mosaic of spaces. This panel explores the narrative and visual representation of public and private spaces in contemporary Italy. How do these spaces work as active participants in the shaping of narratives? How does the relation between empirical and representational spaces affect artistic production? Preference will be given to proposals that reflect on the relation between space, narrative, and representation.

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizers by December 30th.

Organizers:

Alessia Martini
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
alessia@live.unc.edu

Francesco Bratos
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
fbratos@live.unc.edu

 

7. THE SOUTH IS THE NEW NORTH: MIGRATIONS, TRANSNATIONALISM, AND THE FEAR OF THE OTHER.

In the last decades, Italy has experienced a process leading towards a multi-ethnic society: from a country of emigration that exported millions of laborers around the world, it is now the destination of many migrants from other countries. This panel explores how Italian literature, cinema, and TV are representing the new Italian social tissue and the country’s reaction to it. The focus of this panel will also include the different types of analysis regarding the narratives of migration from a cultural studies perspective as well as popular culture.

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30th.

Organizer: Corrado Corradini
University of Richmond
ccorradi@richmond.edu

 

8. IPERMEDIALITÀ E CULTURA ITALIANA: OPPORTUNITÀ E LIMITI 

La rivoluzione digitale ha ridefinito il rapporto tra autore, testo, co-testo e contesto. In ambito comparatista la profonda trasformazione delle modalità di fruizione e di produzione di testi permette di connettere diversi ambiti specialistici, garantendo un rigore del lavoro di ricerca e una ricchezza interdisciplinare senza precedenti. Tuttavia esiste il pericolo di una banalizzazione dei contenuti che proietti sul lettore maggiori responsabilità critiche, con un impatto potenzialmente negativo sulle nuove realtà editoriali. Quali esempi nella cultura italiana odierna? Questa sessione prevede i seguenti ambiti di studio: 

– Produrre e fruire nel mondo digitalizzato;
– (Re)edizioni digitali, tra progresso e semplificazione;
– Strategie discorsive del web e desoggetivazione: tra letteratura e social media (social network, blog, riviste online, ecc.);
– Letteratura e videogiochi: forme di rappresentazione, forme di ricezione. 

Si prega di inviare le proposte (150-200 parole), una breve bio-bibliografia entro il 30 dicembre 2018 al seguente indirizzo mail:digitalhumanities.aais19@gmail.com

Organizers:

Daniela Vitagliano
Aix-Marseille Université, Aix-en-Provence

France Antonio Marvasi
Université de Strasbourg-Indiana University (Bloomington) 

 

9. PETRARCH IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY.  

This panel aims to investigate Petrarch’s influence on Italian contemporary poetry. I propose as a starting point Contini’sconcept of juxtaposition between “lineadantesca” and “lineapetrarchesca”, which deeply affects forms and evolution of Italian lyric poetry up to the 20thcentury. The “due corone” of 14thcentury Italian verse embody two polar opposites, not only in terms of language and style, but also in interpreting poetry, its nature, and its social role. While the “lineadantesca” has been extensively investigated, Petrarch’s role in contemporary poetry has generally been overlooked. Keeping in mind the established studies on the topic (such as Petrarca nelNovecento Italiano, ed. Andrea Cortellessa), presenters are invited to submit papers that explore the interaction between Petrarch and poets such as Luzi, Zanzotto, Cardarelli, and others.

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30st..

Organizer: Dario Marcucci
The Graduate Center, CUNY
dmarcucci@gradcenter.cuny.edu

 

10. ENVIRONMENTAL HUMANITIES IN THE MEDITERRANEAN

Positioning Italian studies within the broader discourse of the environmental humanities and in the wider space of the Mediterranean, our goal is to build a creative and critical discourse that elicits differences, pluralities, hybridizations, conflicts, and encounters. We welcome contributions from fields including landscape studies, biosemiotics, ecomedia and film studies, postcolonial studies, migrant ecologies, animal studies, posthumanism, queer theory, environmental justice, energy humanities, and all ecocritical subdisciplines. All areas and subjects of Italian studies, from the Middle Ages to the contemporary age, are welcome.

Please send a 200 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizers by December 30, 2018

Organizers:

Enrico Cesaretti, University of Virginia, efc4p@virginia.edu
Serenella Iovino, Università di Torino, serenella.iovino@unito.it
Elena Past, Wayne State University, elenapast@wayne.edu

 

11. L’INFERNO E ALTRI INFERNI

L’inferno dantesco non è solo la mera descrizione di un regno dell’Oltretomba secondo la teologia cristiana: esso è anche luogo di conoscenza, di prove, di esperienza della punizione e del male. Ciò rende l’Inferno stesso la metafora di ogni altro ‘locus’ in cui v’è almeno lontananza e legge. Questa sessione intende esplorare, all’interno del vasto panorama della letteratura italiana, esempi di Inferni-altri allo scopo di interrogarsi sulle caratteristiche proprie di questi, forse del tutto antitetiche a quelle dantesche, ma modernissime, quali l’incomunicabilità, la solitudine e l’incomprensione.

Si prega di inviare un abstract (in italiano o inglese) di non oltre 250 parole a Marco Marino (marco.marino@santannainstitute.com) entro e non oltre il 30 dicembre 2018.

Organizers:

Marco Marino e Domenico Palumbo
Sant’Anna Institute, Sorrento

 

12. AFTERLIVES

This session considers how cultural traditions and material objects can be repurposed. “Afterlives” might explore the recasting of the canon by successive generations, or translations across borders, categories, and disciplines. “Afterlives” might also examine re-imaginings of human and nonhuman beings, objects, and landscapes; zombies, ghosts, and specters; memory and trauma; the unexpected new life (or death) of objects and beings through recycling or decay; bodily, earthly, or textual archives; the afterlives of political and social movements. We welcome contributions that creatively approach the question of “afterlives” from all theoretical perspectives and time periods.

Please send a 200-word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizers by December 30, 2018.

Session Organizers:

Deborah Amberson, University of Florida, dambers@ufl.edu
Elena Past, Wayne State University, elenapast@wayne.edu

 

13. FICTIONAL REPRESENTATIONS OF VIOLENCE IN THE ITALIAN CULTURAL PRODUCTION BETWEEN 1960 AND THE ANNI DI PIOMBO

This session will focus on different kinds of representations of violence that were produced between the 1960s and the anni di piombo (1969- circa 1984) in literature, film, theater, music, comics, and other media. At a crucial time in the history of the First Italian Republic in terms of polarization of the political agon, economic crises, and social unrest, how were students protests, workers’ manifestations, right and left wing terrorism, state and police violence, and postcolonial and minoritarian struggles for social rights represented in fictional narratives? How was history re-elaborated through these depictions, and to what ends?

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30th.

Organizer:

Massimiliano L. Delfino
Columbia University
m.delfino@columbia.edu

 

14. INCLUSIVE PORTRAYALS: DISABILITIES IN ITALIAN CINEMA

This panel explores how inclusive is Italian cinema in regard to physical and mental disabilities. Are people with limited mobility or developmental disabilities portrayed in a fair, true-to-reality manner? How these portrays work within comedy? Are these characters portrayed by disable actors or by actors who transgress the representations of actual disabilities, as it sometimes occur from a Hollywoodian perspective?

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30th.

Organizer:

Corrado Corradini
University of Richmond
ccorradi@richmond.edu

 

15. NUOVO TEATRO AND NEOAVANGUARDIA: THEATER BETWEEN THE PAGE AND THE STAGE

At the end of the 1950s, the Italian stage began an extraordinary renovation: Bene, de Berardinis, Ricci, Quadri, Scabia, along with many other neo-avant-garde writers took to alternative spaces (such as the cantine romane) and revolutionized the way theater was practiced, experienced, thought. For more info and potential topics, see https://nuovoteatromadeinitaly.sciami.com

Organizers:

Gianluca Rizzo, Colby College, grizzo@colby.edu
Valentina Valentini, La Sapienza Università di Roma, valentinat.valentini@gmail.com

 

16. TEACHING MY RESEARCH: REFLECTIONS, MANAGEMENT, PERSPECTIVES/ Round Table

When funding to humanities and language departments diminish, and language is often not a requirement, one’s research needs to find new avenues for expression, besides courses for Italian majors or graduate students. Often the options are first-year seminars or Gen-Ed courses. But how can a research in a specific topic in Italian Studies adapt to the requirements of these courses and appeal to a wide student population? Can these courses help in replenish our Italian classes? How? This roundtable reflects on the perspectives of Italian Studies from the point of view of the exchange between research and teaching.

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the round table organizer by December 30th.

Organizer: Lucia Gemmani
The University of Iowa
lucia-gemmani@uiowa.edu

 

17. BERLUSCONI REVISITED: A LOOK BACK FROM TRUMP’S AMERICA/ Round Table

The superficial parallels are easy to see: the improbable physical appearance, the accumulation of power through dominance of the media landscape, the seeming imperviousness to shame or censure, the startling amorality paradoxically embraced by powerful religious interests. But rather than looking to Berlusconi for insight into Trump, this panel proposes a look back at Berlusconi from the vantage point of the current political moment in the United States: how has Trumpism changed our views on Berlusconi and his years in (and out) of power?

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the round table organizer by December 30th, 2018

Organizer: John Andrew Welsh
Wake Forest University
welshja@wfu.edu

 

18. INNOVATIVE TOOLS FOR SUCCESSFUL TEACHING ITALIAN LITERATURE AND UPPER LEVEL COURSES / Round Table

This roundtable explores examples of good practice in the incorporation of technology in Italian Literature Courses and Upper Level Courses. It seeks to provide all participants and audience members with new tools, strategies, and activities for immediate adoption in the classroom setting. We particularly welcome interdisciplinary approach to foster and facilitate students learning of Italian Language, Literature, Culture and Cinema.

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the round table organizers by December 30th, 2018

Organizers:

Annachiara Mariani
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
amariani@utk.edu

and

Silvia Tiboni-Craft
Wake Forest University
tibonis@wfu.edu

 

19. AESTHETICS OF CONSTRICTION AND NARRATIONS OF FREEDOM

Although diverse in time, space and function, these realities do have a fundamental element in common: they create a special connection between human beings, time and space: classic and mainstream literatures have seen a huge increase in fictional and non-fictional representations of prison, cloister, madhouse and lager. This panel seeks papers on any aspects of the representation of prison narrative, from literature to cinema, comics, cinema, tv.

Please send a two hundred words abstract, in Italian or in English with the title of the paper, an outline of its content and eventual media needs with a short bio to Roberto Risso (Clemson University) by December 30th, 2018

 

Organizer: Roberto Risso
Clemson University
rrisso@clemson.edu

 

20. ITALIAN TELEVISION TODAY

Submissions on recent Italian television and viewing platforms. Of particular interest are papers that consider contemporary television industry (production models, casting, stars, marketing, distribution), acting/performance, ancillary products (spinoffs, satire, merchandising), audiences and reception, relationship to cinema and notions of quality TV, diverse viewing platforms, transnational productions, and Italian Television abroad.

Please send a 200-word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizers by December 30, 2018.

Co-organizers:

Rebecca Bauman
Fashion Institute of Technology
rebecca_bauman@fitnyc.edu

and

Dana Renga
The Ohio State University
renga.1@osu.ede

 

21. GLOBAL EXCHANGES BETWEEN ITALY AND THE AMERICAS (1600-1700)

This session focuses on the circulation and reception of Italian Renaissance and Baroque art in the New World and vice-versa.  While general claims have been made about Italy’s indirect participation in the American colonial enterprise, new scholarship about artistic exchanges between Italy and the Americas is quickly dismantling this myth. This session will consider cross-cultural, interdisciplinary, and inter-medial approaches that address how different media, materials, and objects acted as agents of interaction and exchange in the transatlantic world

Please send a 200-300-word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30th, 2018.

Organizer: Lisandra Estevez
Winston-Salem State University
estevezl@wssu.edu

22. QUEER ECOLOGIES, ITALIAN STYLE

Sponsored by the Queer Studies Caucus

This panel seeks to explore the intersections of queer and ecocritical Italian studies. Drawing on Catriona Mortimer Sandilands and Bruce Erickson’s claim that “there is an ongoing relationship between sex and nature that exists institutionally, discursively, scientifically, spatially, politically, poetically, and ethically,” (2010) we welcome papers that track the imbrications of the natural and the sexual in Italian or Italophone cultural production. We are particularly interested in interventions cognizant of the overdeterminations that often mark the conceptual fields of sex and nature, and that seek to understand the convergences of the social, material and environmental as ecologies. Possible topics include but are not limited to:

– urban ecology
- migration and the environment
- biopolitics
- new materialism
- non-reproductive futurities
- queer and geological temporalities
- animal studies
- political movements and government policies
- heterotopias
- intersections of sex, race and ecology
- toxic discourses and representations of purity
- queer performance studies
- the post-human
- eco-queer activism and other coalitional politics

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizers by December 30th, 2018:

Organizers:

Jonathan Mullins
University of Southern California
mullinsj@usc.edu

Monica Seger
William & Mary
mjseger@wm.edu

 

23. FEAR IN ITALIAN LIFE

In a progressively news inundated world, contemporary Italian social and cultural discourse is concerned with narratives of fear. This session aims to elaborate a fuller understanding of the mechanisms that generate this emotion or the effects that it produces. It invites analyses of representations of fear on page, stage, film, and media. Please send 150-200-word abstract of your proposed paper, a brief biographical note, and request for audio-visual equipment by December 30, 2018.

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30th, 2018:

Organizer: Simonetta Milli-Konewko
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
smilli@uwm.edu

 

24. EPOS 2.0: MITO E MITI NELL’ITALIA DEL XXI SECOLO

La presente sessione intende esplorare il fervido legame tra mito e cultura contemporanea, focalizzandosi sulle modalita’ in cui quest’ultima e’ in grado di declinare/rielaborare – in chiave post-moderna – le figure esemplari classiche (Ulisse, Edipo, Fedra…) e post-classiche (Tristano, Faust, Don Giovanni…) e i loro exempla, attraverso la letteratura, il cinema, la musica, il teatro. L’epos di riferimento e’ quello greco-romano ma non saranno trascurate le storie bibliche, le narrazioni orientali, le saghe nordiche. In particolare, sono benvenuti interventi che esaminino come tale “eredita'” sia oggi rappresentata, esaltata, criticata, superata, negata.

Si prega di inviare un abstract (in italiano o inglese) di non oltre 250 parole a Marco Marino (entro e non oltre il 30 dicembre 2018).

Organizers:

Marco Marino
Sant’Anna Institute
marco.marino@santannainstitute.com

Laura Nieddu
Université Lumière Lyon 2
laura.nie@hotmail.com

 

25. ITALIAN DETECTION FICTION:  INVESTIGATING THE INVESTIGATORS

Italian detective fiction has enjoyed immense popularity with readers and viewers worldwide. In 2017, for example, Andrea Camilleri stated in Ora Dimmi Di Te, that more than eighteen million copies of his Commissario Montalbano series had been sold in Italy alone. The television adaptation of that series surpassed one billion two hundred million viewers. Despite the huge success of this series and others, Italian Detection fiction remains a genre that is undervalued and usually overlooked in serious academic venues.  Although individual writers such as Umberto Eco and Leonardo Sciascia garnered praise and admiration, Italian Detection Fiction remains a sub-genre.  Writers such as Maurizio De Giovanni, Carlo Lucarelli, Massimo Carlotto, as well as younger writers such as Piergiorgio Pulixi, Luigi Romolo Carrino, and Luca Poldelmengo have not been adequately recognized or studied by literary and film scholars. The goal of this panel is to raise the level of awareness of Italian Detective Fiction  and to generate greater serious academic study of this increasingly important genre in portraying contemporary Italian society.

Topics could include but are not limited to:

Detective fiction in creating and revealing a sense of place
Its ability to convey national and regional identities and differences
Adaptation from novel to screen
A study of language and style
Impact of a television series adapted from a detective novel
Depiction of landscape and cities
Reflection of social and political aspects of Italian society
Corruption at various levels – including political, economic and within the police force itself
Psychological portraits of the chief investigator
Tension and/or connection between fact and fiction

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30th, 2018:

Organizer: Anthony Fragola
University of North Carolina Greensboro
anfragol@uncg.edu

 

26. GENRE IN CONTEMPORARY POPULAR ITALIAN FILM AND TV

Genre cycles are particularly interesting with regards to what they might reflect about society. This panel invites proposals regarding genre cycles in terms of convention (repeating, undoing, or as crossed with other genres), industry (production, marketing, distribution and viewing platforms), acting (stars, unprofessional actors, onscreen performance), and audience studies (cult vs. mainstream followings, national vs. global contexts, and analysis of population demographics). We welcome proposals that consider the following genres in a contemporary context: Comedy, the Western, Film Noir, Crime/Gangster, Thriller, Drama, Horror, Sci-Fi, Women’s cinema, Buddy Films, Fantasy, Adventure/Action, Cinepanettone, Musicals, and Documentary.

Please submit a 200-300 word abstract of the presentation, a brief bibliographical note, and requests for audio-visual equipment to session organizer by December 30, 2018.

Organizer: Lauren De Camilla
The Ohio State University
decamilla.2@osu.edu

 

27. DEFLECTIONS & RIFRACTIONS: ITALIAN LITERATURE AND THE BIBLE 

Along with a compact corpus of writings from the Greco-Roman tradition, the Bible is the book writers have had at their disposal as a repository for their inspiration. From Dante to Pasolini, patterns of imitation and parodies have shaped countless reuses of biblical archetypes. From St. Francis to Msgr. Ravasi, popularizing preachers and academic exegetes have provided audiences with a variety of tools to decode the same Urtext. This panel explores examples of such interactions across Italian literature. Contributions may focus on specific episodes, characters, books or genres. Papers on Biblical translations (from medieval volgarizzamenti to Ceronetti) are also welcome. 

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30th, 2018 

Organizer: Alberto Gelmi
The Graduate Center – City University of New York
gelmi.alberto@gmail.com

 

28. ITALIAN CRITICAL THEORY IN THE  20thAND 21stCENTURIES  

Inspired by Dario Gentili’s Italian Theory, this panel seeks to investigate the many intellectual currents within Italian critical thinking. Gentili maps the theoretical territory occupied by Gramsci, Della Volpe, Operaismo, Cacciari’s Negative philosophy, Vattimo’s Pensiero debole, Feminist theory and Agamben and Esposito’s biopolitical paradigms. In the same spirit, the potential contributors to this panel are encouraged to explore the topics examined by Gentili or investigate other areas of Italian critical thought and the ways in which it has affected how we perceive and analyze culture and society.

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30th, 2018 

Organizer: Sergio Ferrarese
College of William and Mary
sferrarese@wm.edu

 

29. LITERATURE, CINEMA, THEORY AND LABOR IN MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY ITALY

Since the Italian economic boom, the theme of labor has undergone multiple mutations and treatments in literary, cinematic and theoretical works. The major shift from a paradigm of material production to another, immaterial one has been at the center of works by Ottieri, Volponi, Calvino, Fortini, Arpino, Balestrini, Rea, Michela Murgia, and Celestini, in literature; Rocco e i suoi fratelliLa classe operaia va in paradisoLa stella che non c’è and Tutta la vita davanti in film; and in theoretical works like Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks,Tronti’s Operai e Capitale, and Negri and Hardt’s Empire. This panel seeks contributions on all three aforementioned genres in the 20thand 21stcenturies.

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30th, 2018 

Organizer: Sergio Ferrarese
College of William and Mary
sferrarese@wm.edu

 

30. THE GREAT WAR AND REFLECTIONS ON THE HUMAN SPIRIT

As we are commemorating the centenary of World War One, we would like to consider the ways in which this conflict has been commemorated in Italy for the past century. This session’s purpose is to organize a panoramic view on the legacy of WWI through a wide range of historical approaches as well as cross-disciplinary insights such as literature, poetry, film and art.

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30th, 2018

Organizer: Rémi Lanzoni
Wake Forest University
lanzoni@wfu.edu

 

31. SCRITTURE SPERIMENTALI / EXPERIMENTAL WRITINGS

This panel aims to explore 20th-century experimental works of all genres, characterized by a non-normative approach to language or the act of writing itself. Papers analyzing the intersection between literature and other art forms as well as cross-disciplinary and/or non-traditional approaches to the theme of experimentation are welcome.

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30th, 2018 

Organizers:

Beppe Cavatorta
University of Arizona Tucson
beppe@email.arizona.edu

Gianluca Rizzo
Colby College

Federica Santini
Kennesaw State University

 

32. OBSCENITY AND CENSORSHIP, ‘200-‘600

This panel invites scholarship on the production and curation of transgressive speech in medieval and early modern texts. Possible topics include classical and contemporary rhetorical theory, poetic license, self-constraint, institutional censorship, print editions before and after the Council of Trent, obscenity in translation between vernacular(s) and Latin, coded speech, gendered norms of decorum, and marginalia and readers’ reception.

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30th, 2018.

Organizer: Maggie Fritz-Morkin
UNC-Chapel Hill
mfritzm@email.unc.edu

 

33. CLARA SERENI: IN MEMORIAM /Sponsored by the Women’s Studies Caucus

Clara Sereni’s writing journey began in 1974 with SigmaEpsilon,and flourished through the years with the publication of numerous inspiring and thought-provoking fictional and non-fictional works that have incommensurably enriched the scene of contemporary Italian literature. Her writing was a political act, a way to assert the importance of the private self, a tool to give voice to the underserved, the “others” in a continuous literary experimentation. This panel invites contributions that examine any aspects of Clara Sereni’s writing by delving into questions that may include but are not limited to women’s life, autobiography, history, politics, disability, and food. This panel is sponsored by the Women’s Studies Caucus (WSC).

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizers by December 30th, 2018

Organizers:

Giulia Po DeLisle
UMASS Lowell
giulia_delisle@uml.edu

Giovanna Miceli-Jeffries
University of Wisconsin-Madison
gmicelij@wisc.edu

 

34. MODELLI EDUCATIVI NELLA LETTERATURA PER LE BAMBINE /Sponsored by the Women’s Studies Caucus

Il tema dell’educazione della donna rappresenta uno dei campi mano esplorati della storiografia pedagogica. A questa dimenticanza si è unita spesso  la scarsa rilevanza data a quelle figure femminili che hanno svolto, in varie epoche, una funzione intellettuale di primo piano, contribuendo alla creazione di nuovi modelli pedagogici. Sono benvenuti gli interventi (in italiano o in inglese) su tutte le scrittrici che hanno contribuito, con la loro opera, al dibattito sulla specificità educativa femminile. Sono incoraggiati gli approcci di tipo interdisciplinare.

Please send a brief abstract on the topic of your presentation (250 words) followed by a brief biography to cosetta.seno@colorado.edu. Deadline: January 15 2019.

Organizer: Cosetta Seno
University of Colorado
cosetta.seno@colorado.edu

 

35. ROUNDTABLE: TEACHING DACIA MARAINI /Sponsored by the Women’s Studies Caucus

This round table seeks to address methodological questions on the teaching of Dacia Maraini’s texts. Such questions might include, but are not limited to, the following: • Which of Maraini’s texts do you happen to use most in your courses? • In which type of courses would it be appropriate to include the studying of Maraini’s’s works (Women’s Studies, Italian Literature Courses, History of women, others)? • How do you organize and approach the teaching of these texts? • Are there any particular challenges in teaching Dacia Maraini’s texts? • Do you select texts in translation or in Italian? • What are students’ reactions when they read Dacia Maraini? The round table will have an open format, and will include shorter presentations (5-6 minutes) that focus on the panelist’s area of interest in relation to the topic, followed by a 45-minute discussion.

Please send a brief abstract on the topic of your presentation (250 words) followed by a brief biography to cosetta.seno@colorado.edu. Deadline: January 15 2019.

Organizer: Cosetta Seno
University of Colorado at Boulder
cosetta.seno@colorado.edu

 

36. ROUNDTABLE: TEACHING PAOLA MASINO  /Sponsored by the Women’s Studies Caucus

This round table seeks to address methodological questions on the teaching of Paola Masino’s texts. Such questions might include, but are not limited to, the following: • Which of Masino’s texts do you happen to use most in your courses? • In which type of courses would it be appropriate to include the studying of Masino’s works (Women’s Studies, Italian Literature Courses, History of women, others)? • How do you organize and approach the teaching of these texts? • Are there any particular challenges in teaching Paola Masino’s texts? • Do you select texts in translation or in Italian? • What are students’ reactions when they read Paola Masino? The round table will have an open format, and will include shorter presentations (5-6 minutes) that focus on the panelist’s area of interest in relation to the topic, followed by a 45-minute discussion.

Please send a brief abstract on the topic of your presentation (250 words) followed by a brief biography to cosetta.seno@colorado.edu. Deadline: January 15 2019.

Organizer: Cosetta Seno
University of Colorado at Boulder
cosetta.seno@colorado.edu

 

37. ANNA MARIA ORTESE /Sponsored by the Women’s Studies Caucus

Anna Maria Ortese, nel suo percorso poetico, ha rivisitato e trasformato tutti i generi letterari da lei esplorati: Il reportage, la fiaba, l’autobiografia, il romanzo storico, il romanzo giallo. Sono benvenuti gli interventi (in italiano e in inglese) su ogni aspetto dell’opera dell’autrice e sono incoraggiati gli approcci di tipo interdisciplinare.

Please send abstract (250 words) and short biography by January 15, 2019 to Cosetta Seno cosetta.seno@colorado.ed

Organizer: Cosetta Seno
Unversity of Colorado at Boulder
cosetta.seno@colorado.edu

 

38. THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF CONTEMPORARY FEMINISMS IN ITALY / Sponsored by the Women’s Studies Caucus

This panel will examine contemporary feminist theories and practices in Italy.   How are Italian feminist writers, scholars, activists addressing larger global questions about human rights and what it means to be human?  How are feminists from different fields and different perspectives using and analyzing digital media?   How does feminist activism in Italy address the everyday realities of sexual harassment and domestic violence?

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30th, 2018

Organizer: Juliann Vitullo
Arizona State University
Juliann.vitullo@asu.edu

 

39. GENDER STUDIES AND THE ANTROPOCENE /Sponsored by the Women’s Studies Caucus

This panel will focus on the productive dialogue between gender studies and ecocriticism in Italian thought and society within a broader globalized context.  What does gender studies tell us about the concept of the Anthropocene?  What is the impact of ecocriticism on gender studies?  How does a cross-cultural, interdisciplinary approach change the answers to those questions?

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30th, 2018

Organizer: Juliann Vitullo
Arizona State University
Juliann.vitullo@asu.edu

 

40. CHARACTER PORTRAITS: INVENTION AND EKPHRASIS (SPONSORED BY THE ITALIAN ART SOCIETY)

Artists’ portraits became ubiquitous during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.  Beyond representing their appearance, artists also showed themselves in other guises, from heroes to villains. Similarly, contemporary ekphrastic portrayals could reveal the artist’s character and actions. This session explores how artists represented themselves or were represented, in words and images.

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30th, 2018.

Organizer: Shelley E. Zuraw
University of Georgia
szuraw@uga.edu

 

41. DIASPORA, ARCHIVE, ACADEMY: MAXIMIZING THE CLASSROOM-ARCHIVE CONNECTION IN/ACROSS ITALIAN AND ITALIAN AMERICAN STUDIES

Humanities disciplines have sought to reach beyond their walls through collaborations with museums, archives, and historical societies. In an effort to identify faculty working in these environments and to foster a community of such faculty and our initiatives, this roundtable seeks interventions from members currently engaging archival materials through the Italian Studies and Italian American Studies classrooms. Within what kinds of curricula have these experiences taken place? What kinds of institutional partnerships are possible and preferable? How can student research be, in turn, archived and made visible to larger research, teaching, and interest communities? How can these initiatives be made sustainable?

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30th, 2018.

Organizer: Lina Insana
University of Pittsburgh
insana@pitt.edu

 

42. DE-STEREOTYPING ITALY: TEACHING ITALIAN CULTURE IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE CONTEXT

When studying Italian as a Foreign Language, the contact with the target culture is usually mediated through stereotypes and common tropes. Therefore, the Italian instructor has the crucial role to deconstruct and de-stereotype those aspects which can generate a misleading perception and competence of Italian language and culture. The aim of this panel is to analyze which main aspects of Italy and Italians tend to be simplified in stereotypes and discuss how to reconfigure them, return them to their complexity, and eventually use them to the students’ advantage. Contributions from different disciplines/fields (cinema, literature, art, media, among others) are welcome, in order to broaden the boundaries of language teaching practices.

Please send a 200-300 word abstract (in english or in italian), brief bio, and request A/V to the session organizer by December 30th, 2018.

Organizer: Claudia Meneghetti
Wake Forest University, Università Ca’ Foscari
meneghc@wfu.edu

 

43. REPRESENTATIONS OF EMPTINESS

The artistic representation of an empty space discloses the possible meaningfulness of such emptiness: from this perspective, represented emptiness can be considered a productive value. This panel seeks to analyze and problematize the representation of emptiness, zones of emptiness, or emptied spaces in Italian literature, cinema, and figurative arts.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Spaces of emptiness: desert; sea; cosmos;
  • Emptied space: the aftermath of a catastrophe; abandoned cities/buildings
  • Formal aspects of emptiness: blank space on the page; avant-garde writing
  • Critical approaches: (post-)anthropocene; ecocriticism

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizers by December 30th, 2018.

 

Organizers:Andrea Capra
acapra@stanford.edu
Stanford University

Daniele Biffanti
dbiffant@stanford.edu

Stanford University

 

44. TEACHING IGIABA SCEGO

Award-winning author, academic, activist, and journalist, Igiaba Scego has produced wide-ranging work that plays a vital role in current debates on Italy’s colonial past, its sexist and racist legacy, and the identity of Italians of African origins. It also raises the question of fiction’s place in these discussions. This roundtable invites participants to address how we teach Scego, from a variety of perspectives. Issues might include the significance of the contexts in which we teach Scego’s work: in courses on colonialism, migrant literature, the novel, short fiction, women authors, children’s literature, Jewish Studies, Italian literature, journalism, transnationalism, European literature, etc. What distinct elements of Scego’s work do these courses highlight? Which texts do you pair or contrast with Scego’s and why? What are students’ reactions to reading Scego? What are the difficulties involved in teaching Scego’s work to an American audience? How do you navigate American and Italian concepts of race? Do you include her work in courses taught in English or Italian? Presenters will give brief presentations (7-8 minutes) to allow ample time for discussion. All presenters will provide a paragraph from Scego’s work before the conference, so we can have some specific texts to ground our conversation.

Please send a 100-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the round table organizer by December 30th.

Organizer: Saskia Ziolkowski
Duke University
sez6@duke.edu

 

45. ELENA FERRANTE’S CASE IN LITERATURE AND FILM: POSTFEMINIST OR COMMERCIAL OPERATION?

Over the past ten years, author Elena Ferrante’s bestselling novels—including Troubling LoveThe Days of AbandonmentThe Lost Daughter, and the tetralogy known in English as the Neapolitan Novels—have won her a fervent following also outside her native Italy: Ferrante is now among the most important Italian writer of her generation. Her novels portraying women and their passions from second postwar to contemporary days in Italy inspired film directors such as Mario Martone, Roberto Faenza, and a TV miniseries.  What Ferrante defines “domesticating the truth” aroused fiery debates whether her work is a post-feminist rendition or a commercial operation.

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30th, 2018.

Organizer: Daniela Cunico Dal Pra
University of North Carolina Charlotte
dcunicod@uncc.edu

 

46. QUEER ITALY IN A TRANSNATIONAL FRAME / Queer Studies Caucus

We invite participants to think about Italian queerness in a transnational context who have a capacious understanding of the terms “queer,” Italy,” and “transnational.” This intentionally broad categorization considers many different perspectives and provocations. We will discuss the intellectual, political, and creative histories by which they are informed and that they engender. Topics may include:

Queer Italy and its diasporas
Queer Italians around the world
Queer Italian culture in translation
Transnational productions of Queer “Italian” Media
The circulation/influence of non-Italian queer culture and thought in Italy

Participants will give brief (5min.) presentations and offer two discussion questions in advance of the session.

Please send a brief statement (~250 words), brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by December 30th, 2018

Organizer: Queer Studies Caucus
aaisqueerstudiescaucus@gmail.com

 

47. ROUNDTABLE: TEACHING MULTICULTURAL ITALY

In the past forty years, Italian society and contextual notions of national identity have undergone significant reconsideration and reflection in the public and private spheres. This roundtable discusses the pedagogical modalities that can be adopted to teach Italian multiculturalism through the use of films, social media, television, literature, music, etc.

Please send a 200-300 word abstract and brief bio to the session co-organizers by December 30th, 2018.

Co-organizers:

Michela Ardizzoni
University of Colorado Boulder
michela.ardizzoni@colorado.edu

Cosetta Seno
University of Colorado Boulder
cosetta.seno@colorado.edu

 

48. ROUNDTABLE: DIVERSITY IN CONTEMPORARY ITALOPHONE WOMEN’S WRITING – Sponsored by the Women’s Studies Caucus

Contemporary Italian literature features an increasing number of women writers, who are differently positioned vis-à-vis Italian culture. Whether Italians living abroad (such as Marisa Fenoglio), bilingual and/or multicultural writers residing in Italy (such as Igiaba Scego), or foreign writers choosing to write in Italian (such as Jhumpa Lahiri), these authors provide particular insights on diversity in Italian culture. This roundtable proposes a discussion with and about contemporary Italophone women writers and their engagement with diversity issues. We invite proposals focusing on specific writers, thematic issues, and/or particular uses of narrative and storytelling.

Please send a 200-300 word abstract and brief bio to the session co-organizers by December 30th, 2018.

Co-organizers:

Michela Ardizzoni
University of Colorado Boulder
michela.ardizzoni@colorado.edu

Cosetta Seno
University of Colorado Boulder
cosetta.seno@colorado.edu

 

49. GAMIFICATION AND (VIDEO)GAME-BASED LEARNING IN THE F/L2 CLASSROOM: PRESENT AND FUTURE APPROACHES

In the past two decades, crowdfunding and renewed interest in non-digital games (board games, role-playing games, and instructional games) and videogames have created a diverse gaming production, which has become the subject of several studies and projects related to education. To explore and assess the impact that Gamification and (Video)game-based learning can have for developing language proficiency, intercultural competence, and/or critical thinking in our Italian language and culture courses, this roundtable invites approaches for teaching materials (ranging from classroom activities to whole curricula) that are informed by gamification, game-based, and videogame-based F/L2 language acquisition.

Please send a 200-300 word abstract and brief bio to the roundtable co-organizers by December 30th, 2018.

Roundtable organizers:

Simone Bregni
Saint Louis University
simone.bregni@slu.edu

Brandon Essary
Elon University
bessary@elon.edu

Camilla Zamboni
Wesleyan University
czamboni@wesleyan.edu

 

50. BETWEEN BODIES AND INSURGENCIES

This session invites scholarship that investigates how human bodies inform and challenge literary frameworks, cinema, performative arts, economic and sociopolitical debates in the 20th century. From biopolitics to medical disciplines, phenomenology to ecocriticism and Anthropocene studies, this discussion focuses on issues of perception, affect, corporeal identity, forms of protest and agency, apocalyptic imageries of bodies, eco-bodies and the nonhuman. Approaches across disciplines and art forms, media and historical trajectories are strongly encouraged.

Please, submit via email a 250-300 word abstract, a brief biographical note, and requests for audio visual equipment to the session organizer by Dec. 30th.

Organizer: Giuliano Migliori
The Ohio State University
migliori.2@osu.edu

 

51. DANTE 2021: UNHOLY AND HOLY VIOLENCE, SILENCE, NAMES, AND WORDS

To celebrate the seventh centenary of Dante’s death in 2021, Annali d’italianistica plans to devote its 39th monographic volume to the connections between Christ’s violent sacrifice—the sine qua non for Everyman’s salvation—and the poetic rendering of the Pilgrim’s journey from Hell to Purgatory and Paradise. To this purpose, the editors of the volume plan to organize several sessions at national and international conventions on the volume’s topic and welcomes paper proposals on the following issues: the torments of the damned in Inferno as a parody of Christ’s salvific sacrifice; the sufferings of the purgatorial souls, who, contrary to those in Hell, shed no blood, as the manifestation of their full acceptance of Christ’s Redemption; and the singing, dancing, and splendor of the blessed in Heaven as the glorification of Christ’s redemptive death. Although not sharing in the torments of the souls in Hell, the Pilgrim actively participates in the purifications of Purgatory and in the joy of the blessed. Dante the Poet plies his poetic craft to describe appropriately the spiritual condition of the souls and the Pilgrim’s journey in the afterlife.

Please, submit via email a 250-300 word abstract, a brief biographical note, and requests for audio visual equipment to the session organizer by Dec. 30th.

Organizer: Dino Cervigni
University of North Carolina
cervigni@unc.edu

 

52: OPEN SESSION 

This session welcomes all abstracts whose subject does not fit in any of the present sessions and round table proposals listed on this page. Please, submit via email a 250-300 word abstract, a brief biographical note, and requests for audio visual equipment to the session organizer by Dec. 30th.

Organizer: Rémi Lanzoni
Wake Forest University
lanzoni@wfu.edu

 

53. THE CINEMA OF BERNARDO BERTOLUCCI

Recently Italian filmmaker Bernardo Bertolucci died in Rome. The director earned both recognition and condemnation for movies, such as “The Last Emperor” or “Last Tango in Paris,” that included graphic content and sensitive topics. Bertolucci made films that both followed and defied the conventions of his times and won the praise from many critics around the world of international cinema. This session welcomes contributions that will offer a new look at one of Italy’s most famous filmmakers and auteur and contribute to the scholarly understanding of Bertolucci’s legacy and his contribution to Italian cinema.

Please, submit via email a 250-300 word abstract, a brief biographical note, and requests for audio visual equipment to the session organizer by Dec. 30th.

Organizer: Rémi Lanzoni
Wake Forest University
lanzoni@wfu.edu

 

54. NATION AND TRANSLATION I, THE ORIGINS

We seek presentations about national language discourse in Medieval and Renaissance time, when establishing a national, political identity was unattainable. Contributions covering Dante’s De vulgari eloquentia, Renaissance translations, and Bembo’s Questione della linguaare welcome, as they relate attempts to codify Italian, exemplified by the Accademia della Crusca’s 1612 vocabolario.

Please, submit via email a 250-300 word abstract, a brief biographical note, and requests for audio visual equipment to the session organizers by Dec. 30th.

Co-Organizers:

Valerio Ferme
Nothern Arizona University
valerio.ferme@nau.edu

Norma Bouchard
San Diego State University
nbouchard@sdsu.edu

 

55. NATION AND TRANSLATION II, THE BIRTH OF A NATION

This panel explores translation and nationhood in the 18thand 19thcenturies. As translation from foreign languages superseded the Classics, theories and practices relating translation to national politics took center stage. Submissions might explore single authors, texts and translators, or the intersections between nationalistic discourse and translation as they relate to the creation of Italy.

Please, submit via email a 250-300 word abstract, a brief biographical note, and requests for audio visual equipment to the session organizers by Dec. 30th.

Co-Organizers:

Valerio Ferme
Nothern Arizona University
valerio.ferme@nau.edu

Norma Bouchard
San Diego State University
nbouchard@sdsu.edu

 

56. NATION AND TRANSLATION III, FASCISM AND BEYOND

In this panel, we seek contributions that speak to fascist policies pertaining to translation and national linguistic and cultural practices; and to contemporary practices and theories tying together policies of nationhood and translation, as they emerge in the writerly and communicative practices of Italians who are bilingual authors and translators.

Please, submit via email a 250-300 word abstract, a brief biographical note, and requests for audio visual equipment to the session organizers by Dec. 30th.

Co-Organizers:

Valerio Ferme
Nothern Arizona University
valerio.ferme@nau.edu

Norma Bouchard
San Diego State University
nbouchard@sdsu.edu

 

57. MOBILITY AND MIGRATION IN EARLY MODERN ITALY 

This panel invites scholarship that reflects on the notion of space, mobility, and/or migration in early modern texts. Papers on the representation of migration and settlement, women’s travel (real or imagined), and forced migration and the exile/refugee experience are welcomed. Topics need not be limited to discussions of geographic mobility but may address social mobility, gender fluidity, translation and adaptation (semiotic mobility), or resistance to any or all of the aforementioned.

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by January 15th, 2018

Organizer: Tessa Gurney
High Point University
tgurney@highpoint.edu

 

58. FUGHE E RITORNI NEL CINEMA ITALIANO CONTEMPORANEO 

Fughe e ritorni nel cinema italiano contemporaneo. Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by January 15th, 2018

Organizer: Antonio Vitti
Indiana University
ancvitti@indiana.edu

 

59. MULTI-DISCIPLINARY APPROACHES TO RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION OF STUDENTS IN ITALIAN STUDIES PROGRAMS

 In the twenty-first century, recruitment and retention of students is a problem that all disciplines of the humanities are seeking to address; but language programs are specifically in need of confronting this problem. This panel seeks to explore cross-disciplinary approaches to recruiting and retaining students who do not normally enroll in further foreign language study after their university-specific requirements are satisfied. The panel will address an array of topics including the recruitment of students pursuing business-related studies and means and ways to engage them in adding foreign language to their curriculum; recruitment among students with non-European backgrounds by identifying their often-neglected interest in European language and culture; and lastly it will focus on recruitment and retention of students who have studied or otherwise have advanced knowledge of another Romance language.

Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by January 15th, 2018

Organizers:Garrett Waters (Chair)
gary.russell.waters@emory.edu

Simona Muratore
Rossella di Rosa